Lesson from an Old Barn

Growing up in Tennessee, I’ve been spoiled rotten by being surrounded by barns.  I absolutely love them.  The more run down that they are…the better!

One day, I finally asked myself why I like run down barns so much.  I wondered whether it was because run-down barns were filled with potential to be made better, but that wasn’t it.  Next I thought that I liked them because were probably filled with critters.  That definitely wasn’t it (unless filled with horses, cats, and dogs, of course.)

But none of those reasons were why I love broken barns.  I still love them today for one reason: they have a story.

I love to look at these barns and imagine who built them.  Who was the proud owner that filled each stall with hay?  What happened to make this barn become deserted?  These are also questions that I ask myself while driving past them.  There’s a longing I feel when I see them–a wishing that I could understand and know its story–but the wheels on my car just keep rolling with the rhythm of the road, and the barn is soon out of my sight.

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“For the Lord sees not as man sees:

man looks on the outward appearance,

but the Lord looks on the heart.”

1 Samuel 16:7

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Our Heavenly Father does not cherish us because we look as pristine all the time as a brand new barn that is never used.  After all, what would that barn’s purpose be if it did not house horses and other animals?  How would that barn ever become truly special to its owner if he never touched it?

We were created to live a full life.  That includes all the experiences that we love in addition to those that we dread.  God still loves us, and He created us to live a life touched by Him daily: washing away all our dirt when we ask for forgiveness, rebuilding our hearts as one that replaces boards on a barn.

In this day, see that God looks at your heart and not on your outward appearance.  See that God’s love lays in His involvement in your life and your involvement in the lives of others.

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